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Partying

Who doesn’t enjoy a good party? Whether you’re celebrating a special occasion or allowing your teenager to host a party at home, it’s important to keep safety and security in mind.

The Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH) offers excellent party advice in their brochure, Having a Party? Great Tips to Lower Your Risk as a Host.

If your teen is hosting a party, or your child’s school is planning one, consider these resources:

  • The Greater/Grand Sudbury Region guidelines for parents of teens hosting a party.
  • The Party Smart Manual: A Guide to Safe Events, from the Renfrew County District Health Unit. It’s a valuable resource for parents, educators and teens to help them plan and host safe parties. It also serves as a toolkit for school staff or community groups wishing to hold a “Party Smart” workshop to create more awareness about hosting safe parties.

We also recommend reading the CAMH booklet, Partying and Getting Drunk. In addition to offering important information about the dangers of binge drinking and the signs of alcohol poisoning, it provides tips about being safe when you drink.

Parties when parents are away

Sometimes teenagers or young adults hold a party in the family home when their parents are away. Unsupervised parties can lead to dangerous situations, often fuelled by alcohol or drugs. Uninvited guests can turn up looking for trouble, or the party can become much bigger than planned, simply through word of mouth or Facebook. There is the danger of binge drinking or young people driving under the influence.

If an unsupervised party is taking place in your neighbourhood, contact the following resources:

  • 9-1-1 if a crime is in progress or it is a life-threatening emergency
  • 613-230-6211 for all other emergencies
  • 613-236-1222 for all other police inquiries
  • 3-1-1 to report noise complaints or other bylaw violations

As a parent, there are steps you can take before you go away. Police suggest leaving your cell phone number with neighbours and letting them know when you will be away. That way, if your child hosts a party in the home and it gets out of control, your neighbour can call police and provide them with your number. Once on site, the police will call you for permission to enter your home and deal with any problems.

It is also important for you to understand your responsibilities when your child hosts a party in your home—whether or not you are present. Ontario’s Parental Responsibility Act tells you what you need to know about this issue and much more.

Student household parties

Many of the same problems that occur at parties when parents are away also take place at student household parties, where there is no parental supervision. Contact:

  • 9-1-1 if a crime is in progress or it is a life-threatening emergency
  • 613-230-6211 for all other emergencies
  • 613-236-1222 for all other police inquiries
  • 3-1-1 to report noise complaints or other bylaw violations

If student household parties are an ongoing issue in your neighbourhood, talk to your local Community Police Centre about the problem and how to resolve it.